Advertising Tips from Dave Capps

  • By Dave Capps
  • 01 May, 2014

There are key elements to any successful ad.

Your advertising should grab attention, build traffic, and create sales. I often meet people who claim they don’t know anything about advertising and are content to let others manage it. However,  it is essential that whoever prepares your ads knows what makes them work regardless of placement.

Whether you prepare an ad yourself or need to judge one being presented to you, it should do three things (and you should always keep these advertising tips in mind):

  1. Make a specific, priced offer to sell something,
  2. Instruct the prospect about how to take advantage of the offer
  3. Include a “hurry-upper” such as a limited time, quantity, etc.

If you ensure that every ad you run has these elements, the effectiveness of your advertising will increase dramatically.

Of course, there are even more ways to ensure success. This is just the tip of the iceberg.

If you’d like even more advertising tips, email me or any one of our sales associates to discuss these ideas further.

Dave Capps – dave@cappsbroadcastgroup.com


By Julie Thompson 20 Apr, 2017

A recent presentation through the Radio Advertising Bureau given by Pierre Bouvard, Chief Insights Officer of  Cumulus Media and Westwood, examined common beliefs about consumer media habits.  They turned to Nielsen, Edison Research and The Advertising Research Foundation to check the facts on these assumptions. Here is what they found!

Myth #1 AM/FM radio has very low reach.

The fact is that Nielsen studies show that 93% of Americans 18+ are reached by radio each week!  (1)

Myth #2 If you want mass reach with Millennials, go with television.

The fact is that at 92% weekly reach, AM/FM radio is America’s #1 mass reach medium among 18-34 Millennials. (1)

Myth #3 Audience shares to Pandora/Spotify are nearly equal to AM/FM.

The fact is that AM/FM audience shares are 8x larger than Pandora, and 18x larger than Spotify! (2)

Myth #4 In the world of the connected car, the number one thing people do is stream online radio on their smart phones.

The fact is that AM/FM radio has a 71% share of in car listening, making it the centerpiece of in-car audio. (2)

Myth #5 No one under 35 listens to AM/FM radio anymore.

The fact is that more Millennials listen to AM/FM radio weekly than any other generation! (3)

Myth #6 6 out of 10 marketers believe radio listening is dropping.

The fact is that from 2015-2016 AM/FM radio has grown 7% among persons 25-54. (4)

Myth #7 All marketing dollars should go into digital advertising like mobile and social, especially to reach Millennials.

The fact is that optimal media mix is 78% traditional to 22% digital for persons 18+ and 71% traditional and 29% digital for Millenials 18-34. (5)

Bonus Myth There’s a total lack of ROI and sales lift evidence for radio.

The fact is that Nielsen Return on Advertising Spend report shows that radio generates excellent sales for every dollar of AM/FM advertising across multiple categories.

If you want more information about how Capps Broadcast Group can put the power of radio to work for your business contact us today! 

(1) Nielsen Comparable Metrics Report Q1 2016

(2) Edison Research, “Share of Ear”, Q1-Q4 2016

(3) Nielsen RADAR 132, March 2017, Mon-Sun, 6A-12M

(4) Nielsen Audio Jan-Dec 2016 vs Jan-Dec 2015 % change in AQH, M-F 6a-7p, PPM markets

 (5) The Advertising Research Foundation Optimal Media Mix, “How Advertising Works: Ground Truth Experiment,” March 2016

By Dave Capps 15 Jul, 2015

According to a recent study by Mark Kassof & Co., consumers “grossly underestimate” how much American adults listen to the radio. When asked to estimate what percentage of Americans 18 and older listen to FM or AM radio stations during an average week, a third of the participants answered with percentages that were  less than half.

This perception does not align with the statistical reality.

A recent Nielsen study confirms that even amidst newer technologies for consuming media,  radio continues to reach more than 90% of American adults .

Nielsen, a company that studies consumers in more than 100 countries worldwide, collects data about how people consume media to produce industry-defining Nielsen ratings for television programs and radio stations. Have you ever fallen in love with a new TV show on a major network only to have it be cancelled after a single season? Odds are the show didn’t reach a sophomore season because of a poor Nielsen rating, which meant it wasn’t reaching enough of an audience to merit its continued funding.

Originally, Nielsen studied only radio and television demographics. Today, their measurements account for contemporary ways to consume media (PCs, tablets, and smartphones) as well as traditional media (radio and television). According to one of Nielsen’s most recent studies, despite the proliferation of these newer devices, “radio and traditional television still have the largest reach of any of the platforms analyzed.” 

By Dave Capps 20 May, 2015

Many people aren’t aware of the connections between different types of media, such as how many companies successfully use radio to increase internet traffic.

However, even as these interactions multiply and the internet becomes increasingly engrained in our lives, the steps to making a sale remain constant:

(1) Get the prospect’s attention via intrusive advertising, such as radio
(2) Pique the curiosity of the listener, so that he or she thinks, “Maybe I should look into that…”
(3) …and then says, “Yeah, I want one of those.”
(4) Cause the prospect to act: he or she visits the store and buys the product (or goes to the restaurant for the lunch special, tries the new car wash, calls to make the massage appointment, etc.)

It is highly likely that between the third and fourth steps, (the transition from interest to commitment), the prospect will go online and search for the product to learn more.

The top search results displayed to your prospect have a high SEO (search engine optimization). As prospects browse, they are most likely to click on links listed on the first page. Furthermore, survey results are clear:   Between 72 and 82 percent of respondents say they click on the name they have “heard of.”

That’s where radio comes in, because it’s a form of intrusive advertising that increases top-of-mind awareness (TOMA). When a listener thinks about an industry or product, the brand or organization that first comes to her or his mind has achieved TOMA. Consumers are more likely to purchase something with that name that they so easily recognize.

Your digital presence is crucial in today’s world, but focusing solely on SEO, SEM (search engine marketing), or social media misses a key potential advantage in any buying cycle: TOMA, which can be increased with radio.

TOMA is one of the best ways to edge out your competition, and it’s facilitated by the mix of digital media and radio. Radio grabs attention, creates interest, and builds desire that supports your digital display and SEO/SEM, which will generate leads that increase sales.

Make sure your products and services are known BEFORE search begins so prospects know you and YOU get the sale.

By Dave Capps 10 Dec, 2014

People often say to us, “I don’t have enough money to advertise on radio,” or, “I tried radio for two months and it didn’t work.”

These complaints are saddening. The first one (insufficient funds) doesn’t have to be true. Here at Capps we work with clients of all kinds, and that often includes creating ads for those who want radio with a small budget.  The second one is the product of a trial run that was too short–radio advertising can be incredibly effective, but its benefits can take a while to become evident.

You  can make great radio advertising work with a small budget.

Here’s how. Buy a specified time (9 a.m. news, for example) on a station that has an audience fitting your business, develop an ad that ties in emotionally with that audience, and then stick with it.

How long? As long as it takes for repetition to turn into message retention.

According to advertising wizard Roy. H Williams, “Ads that deliver minimal results in the first few months often become highly effective when you’ve crossed the repetition threshold of the listener. A customer needs to encounter the average message multiple times before it will be retained.”

Ever heard this? “Fifteen minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance.”

It’s pretty difficult to live in the United States of America and not recognize that phrase as GEICO’s slogan.

If the majority of people already associate those words with GEICO, why do they keep spending millions of dollars on advertising and running more than 42,000 radio ads a week to remind us?  Repetition, repetition, repetition.

Williams also says that mass media advertising is “all about (1) repetition and (2) the impact of the message.”

Unless an ad is so effective that encountering it once causes a consumer to respond immediately to its call to action, repetition is required to turn listeners into customers. Luckily, when you work with Capps Broadcast Group, you can still get the repetition that leads to message retention that will benefit your business or cause without the massive capital of a big company like GEICO.

So … how do you get a message with high impact?

I’ll cover that next time.

By Dave Capps 08 Oct, 2014
Your prospects can now respond to your radio ad at any time, anywhere.

Before, radio advertising was only intended to motivate people to call or visit your business. Today, radio advertising still has those goals, but potential prospects have access to an intermediate step —   internet search.   Now, when we tell them what you have, why they should think of you first, and why doing business with you is the right thing to do, they can immediately look up your name.

Thus, with radio you will be sought, not just found.   Research shows that people consider the businesses they have heard of first. Radio can take your business from unknown to “heard of”… to being known, considered, and eventually preferred.

Because people can respond to your ad by going to your website or searching your business from almost anywhere, they’ll quickly find your key information, and you can expect a call or a visit from a real, live prospect.

A consistent radio plan will increase your prospects’ familiarity with your business’ name,   which can lead to top of mind awareness (TOMA). TOMA is the best kind of brand/product/company recognition. When someone mentions an industry, the first name that comes to the listener’s mind has achieved TOMA. Some brands have reached such a high level of TOMA that people perceive and speak about their product to refer to the generic object, such as ChapStick or Kleenex. Because listeners hear our ads, radio positions your ad to develop TOMA.

That’s why  radio  and the  Internet  together make  the  marketing combination for the 21st century.


By Dave Capps 23 Jul, 2014

Your advertising budget should go towards radio because it builds TOP OF MIND AWARENESS (TOMA).

When a listener thinks about an industry or product, the brand or organization that first comes to her or his mind has achieved TOMA. Consumers are more likely to purchase something with that name that they so easily recognize.

Because radio is intrusive, repetitive  and  affordable, it is the best way to build TOMA.

Even a modest radio budget reaches people multiple times, which leads to powerful message retention. The Sears Training Manual states, “Radio is the best way to create new customers,” and it “reaches more people, more often, [and] for less money than any other medium.”

It takes a solid offer, a well-produced ad, and sufficient budget to attain a high level of frequency and increase TOMA, all of which can happen with the help of your Capps representative.

Advertising that fails is expensive; our job is building ads and campaigns that work.

Your advertising budget should go toward TOMA — and the best way to reach it is via radio.


By Dave Capps 01 May, 2014

Your advertising should grab attention, build traffic, and create sales. I often meet people who claim they don’t know anything about advertising and are content to let others manage it. However,  it is essential that whoever prepares your ads knows what makes them work regardless of placement.

Whether you prepare an ad yourself or need to judge one being presented to you, it should do three things (and you should always keep these advertising tips in mind):

  1. Make a specific, priced offer to sell something,
  2. Instruct the prospect about how to take advantage of the offer
  3. Include a “hurry-upper” such as a limited time, quantity, etc.

If you ensure that every ad you run has these elements, the effectiveness of your advertising will increase dramatically.

Of course, there are even more ways to ensure success. This is just the tip of the iceberg.

If you’d like even more advertising tips, email me or any one of our sales associates to discuss these ideas further.

Dave Capps – dave@cappsbroadcastgroup.com


By Dave Capps 05 Feb, 2014
Traditional radio has increased its reach

Major studies — the latest by Scarborough USA PLUS — show that  over the past five years radio has increased its reach of adults in the 18-54, 25-54, and 18-34 demographics.  Radio reaches more than 90 percent of almost any demographic segment of the consumer market every week. Among media entertainment, radio is the leading source of reach.

New media advocates, both local and national, are in love with social media and sell their services for Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc. We love social media as well because it is most useful  in conjunction with  radio – not instead of radio. Our six radio stations, combined with our website,  My Columbia Basin , provide extensive coverage of local news, sports and information.

Because radio is thriving (it’s keeping 242 million people company every week for an average of nearly three hours a day), it’s a great way to reach present and potential customers and drive people to your website.

Want to learn more?  Contact   Capps Broadcast Group   in Pendleton at (541) 276-1511 or Walla Walla at (509) 522-1383.

photo credit:   flavijus   via   photopin   cc

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